New Indoor Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Accepting Patients | infonews

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A family of yellow-bellied marmots take refuge next to the WR Bennett Bridge in City Park.

(CARLI BERRY / iNFOnews.ca)


05 June 2022 – 09:39






A new Okanagan Wildlife Rehabilitation Center now has a provincial rubber stamp to begin accepting patients.

Since its founding in 2020, the Interior Wildlife Rehabilitation Society has been building its new facility which is now ready to give wildlife patients a second chance, according to a press release from the society.

“We have finally obtained federal and provincial operating permits to accept patients into our care, now the Okanagan has a facility to rehabilitate wildlife for release,” said President and Founder Eva Hartmann, in the Press release.


READ MORE: Proposed Small Animal Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Kelowna

Prior to the company’s operations, euthanasia or long-distance transport outside the Okanagan Valley were the only options available for all wildlife other than birds of prey, she said.

The South Okanagan Rehabilitation Center in Oliver only takes raptors.

The BC Wildlife Park in Kamloops has the Fawcett Family Wildlife Health Center which cares for birds, reptiles, amphibians and small mammals. His license does not allow him to capture large mammals, certain birds, eastern gray squirrels, raccoons or groundhogs, among others.

Raptors will continue to be cared for at SORCO in Oliver, where large exercise flight enclosures and an on-site feeding rodent breeding program have long been established especially for them.

The new rehabilitation center has built species-specific housing with various therapy pools for waterfowl, native turtles and other species living around the shores of inland lakes and streams, according to the release.

“We can proudly say that we passed our facility inspection conducted by government officials, including BC wildlife veterinarian Caeley Thacker,” Hartmann said in the press release.

Hartmann is also a licensed veterinary technician.

Interior Wildlife’s mission includes education and expert advice on human-wildlife interactions. Now the facility is also open, where nursing care will be provided to sick or injured wildlife with the aim of releasing them back into their natural habitats.

The Okanagan is growing, human encroachment into natural areas that provide habitat, food and shelter for wildlife is making it increasingly difficult for wild animals to navigate and stay healthy and safe. safe from injury or travel, Hartmann said in the press release.

Native Canadian species are protected under the British Columbia Wildlife Act as well as the Migratory Bird Act. It is illegal for the public to keep wild animals in their possession for more than 24 hours. The new facility will care for native small mammals and waterfowl. However, not all invasive species as well as deer, moose and large carnivores are part of the rehabilitation center’s current permits.

If you think you have found a small wild mammal or aquatic bird in distress, call the RAPP line at 1-877-952-7277 to contact a conservation officer for advice, or take it to a veterinary clinic for evaluation or consult a wildlife specialist. expert in excluding animals from unwanted areas in the home or on private property.

The society does not accept direct deposits from the public, but once the animal is evaluated and considered a candidate for rehabilitation by a professional, volunteers will transport the animal to the IWRS care facility for admission.

The property is not open to the public in accordance with permit restrictions and its exact location remains unknown in Summerland.

Learn more about inland wildlife by visiting its website.


 



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