The antidote: five happy things to read today, August 26

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Whipsnade Zoo in England has welcomed an endangered baby elephant.

Facebook/Whipsnade Zoo

Whipsnade Zoo in England has welcomed an endangered baby elephant.

We live in unusual times. It all gets a bit heavy some days. So every day of the week we bring you a much-needed dose of positivity to remind you that there’s also inspiration, kindness and quirkiness out there.

Watch an endangered baby elephant take its first steps

The thud of the rather large baby’s feet made everyone at Whipsnade Zoo in England delighted to have welcomed an endangered baby elephant.

The not if little calf was born to mum Donna on monday and hidden cameras at the zoo’s Center for Elephant Care captured the baby’s first wobbly steps.

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“This little baby is a very important addition to Europe’s endangered species breeding program for Asian elephants,” said Mark Howes of Whipsnade Zoo. ITV News.

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A teenager’s mission to save neglected pets

Over the past two years, Lilly-Grace Honeysett-Beale, 13, from Shropshire, England, has saved more than 45 animals by searching social media for pets neglected by their owners.

“When I see one who needs help, I go get them,” she told the BBC.

Most of those rescued animals, like rabbits, dogs, cats, and mice, live with her at home, and a small business selling homegrown animal treats helps fund her rescue missions.

The teenager aspires to have her own animal rescue center in the future.

Honeysett-Beale said she scoured Facebook Marketplace for unwanted or neglected animals, then reached out to people she knew to help rescue them.

A modern-day Doctor Dolittle

American chiropractor Joren Whitley is a modern-day Dolittle doctor with a unique clientele.

From dogs, cats, horses to lions and snakes, Dr. Whitley, who lives in Oklahoma, has helped an animal – big or small – get back into shape, The Dodo reports.

“I’m crazy enough to work on just about any animal,” Whitley told The Dodo.

“The only animal I didn’t work on was a porcupine, and that was because my arm was being pricked with needles. I thought ‘if I make a wrong move, I get a needle in my arm.’ So I stepped back gracefully.

Chiropractic care can even be performed for other wild animals. Whitley traveled to South Africa to train vets and even helped a wild lion rehabilitate.

Firefighters rescue horse stuck in mud

Britain's Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service came to the rescue of a horse named Charlie who got stuck on his side in a muddy pond.

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service / twitter

Britain’s Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service came to the rescue of a horse named Charlie who got stuck on his side in a muddy pond.

Great Britain Fire Brigade rescued a 6-year-old horse named Charlie who was stuck in a muddy pond that had lost its water due to recent droughts in the UK, UPI News reported.

Charlie was sedated by a vet to help his rescue and firefighters used ropes, straps and a mechanical shovel to pull him out of the mud.

Fire and rescue services told UPI News that Charlie was uninjured and well after the rescue.

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